Pennsylvania is one of several states that still have at-fault or no-fault divorces. In a fault-based divorce, at least one party asserts that the marriage has broken down due to faults in the relationship like adultery or abuse. In a no-fault divorce, irreconcilable differences might be named as the cause of the marriage’s end.

The kind of divorce you choose may impact how quickly you can divorce. Someone who can prove a fault may not have to wait through the same separation period as a couple going through a no-fault divorce, for example. This is something to consider, especially if you’d like to move forward with your divorce more quickly.

What are the grounds for divorce in Pennsylvania?

The grounds for divorce include:

  • Excessive cruelty
  • Being placed in a mental health institution due to a serious disorder for at least 18 months and with no discharge in the foreseeable future
  • Irreconcilable differences (no fault)
  • Felony conviction
  • Bigamy
  • Abandonment for a year or longer
  • Adultery

Does choosing a fault impact the divorce case?

It can in some ways. For example, if you can prove that your spouse was cheating on you and spending your shared income on another person, then you may be able to seek a greater portion of your marital assets as compensation. You aren’t necessarily guaranteed more just because of adultery, but if it impacted your finances, then you may be in a position to use the facts to your benefit.

Our website has more information on divorcing and how choosing the kind of divorce you want may affect you. Every case is different, so it’s smart to look into the specific options open to you.